Satisfying your curiosity correctly!

Satisfying your curiosity correctly!

It is dreadfully difficult to battle the temptation to spy on your children when they have left their laptop or computer on. You persuade yourself that no possible harm could come from glancing, ever so quickly, into the cyber world of your youngsters. Maybe you have done it, and not felt guilty about it. A little bewildered maybe, but not guilty… Parents generally know where their kids are each day, and what they plan to do. However, when it comes to their children’s “online lives”, parents have been reduced to the role of spectator. Technology today has a big part to do with the life of a youngster. It influences their education, social life and friendships, yet parents still cannot regulate what their children are doing online. Society has a drinking age and a driving age, but there’s no concrete insight on the age children can safely go online unaccompanied, or communicate to a friend via mobile phone. So, what about the role of parents? Should tabs be kept on their children? Nowadays, children are heard laughing over a video on youtube or are just using the Internet to discover a treasure trove of knowledge. Gone are the days were children would ask their mother’s to help out with a history project or use an encyclopedia to retrieve information. Mothers also used to overhear their children’s phone conversations with their friends, however, for today’s children, so much communicating goes on silently, via e-mails, social networks and text messages, which is all out of parent’s range. Parents’ want and need to know what their children are up to, and up...
Online Pressures

Online Pressures

Peer pressure is a particular influence that a peer group exerts onto another individual. This influence encourages these other individuals to change, or, to conform to the peer group’s attitudes, values, or behaviours. Peer pressure is common and is a hallmark of child and adolescent experience. Nowadays, with the use of the Internet and most of all through social networks, peer pressure has taken a new form. Currently, children and adolescents do not only form part of a social group at school or outside of school, but also online. Through the use of chat rooms and communicative sites such as Skype, although physically remote, children are constantly interacting with peers, thus, still making them highly susceptible to peer pressure. Private groups formed by peers on social networking sites may be an instigator for members to conform to the main idea of that particular group. An example of this is group chats, were one will find a number of friends communicating on a single chat log. This type of online chat may lead to what is termed as cyber bullying, which may in turn lead to online peer pressure. This form of pressure is instigated when a group of members feel compelled to conform to a particular idea or topic in a bid to feel part of that group, in this case identifying with the bully. This scenario often occurs as individuals within this particular group aim not to appear different due to fear of not being accepted. Another situation common in schools is that arguments between children and young adolescents, which arise on the school playground, are continuing online....